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employment lawyers Archives - Anderson Gray

know how much you should be paid

Are you a Trainee or Apprentice? Do you Know What you Should be Paid?

By | Unfair Dismissal, Unpaid Wages

Knowing How Much You Should Be Paid

If you are a trainee or apprentice you ought to check that your employer is paying you the correct rate of pay.  If a modern award applies to you, then this workplace instrument covers your employment and sets out the minimum wages that apply to you (unless an enterprise agreement applies to you).

In some states, employers have been paying wages according to a state instrument.  For example, in Queensland, many employers would pay their apprentices with respect to the Order of Apprentices’ and Trainees’ Wages and Conditions (Excluding Certain Queensland Government Entities) 2003.  Queensland Awards and Orders that were Notional Agreement Preserving State Awards (NAPSA), such as the above Order, allowed for State Awards created prior to 27 March 2006, to continue to operate post the introduction of the modern awards system by the Federal Government in 2009.

In 2017, this view changed when the Fair Work Commission found that these instruments are no longer in force and have not continued to operate post 1 January 2014.

In light of this, your employer may not be paying you correctly.  If you think this may apply to you, check your applicable modern award at www.fwc.gov.au to confirm the correct rate of pay.

If you are not being paid correctly and are receiving a lesser amount then you are entitled to you may have an unpaid wages claim.  Did you know that you have six years in which to make an unpaid wage claim?  This means that you can make a claim for unpaid wages that goes back up to six years.

If you need any assistance, do not hesitate to contact Anderson Gray lawyers here in Melbourne, Sydney, and Brisbane – we are here to help.

taking annual leave

Do you Know your Annual Leave Rights?

By | Unfair Dismissal

Understanding your Rights to Annual Leave

Most modern awards now contain additional annual leave provisions that include the ability to:

  • cash out annual leave;
  • take annual leave in advance;
  • manage excessive annual leave balances; and
  • make payment for annual leave during the period of leave.

You are most likely aware that the Fair Work Commission varied a number of modern awards, but do you know all the changes and how they may apply to you?

Cashing out annual leave

You and your employer can make an agreement in writing to cash out your annual leave.  Each time an employee wishes to cash out their leave, a new agreement must be made between you and your employer.  The agreement must state the amount of leave to be cashed out and the amount of the payment to be made to you, including the date the payment is made.

It is important to note that the payment made to you must not be less than the payment you would have received if you had actually taken the period of leave.

However, there are some rules in relation to how much leave you are able to cash out.  The agreement to cash out annual leave must not leave you with an accrued annual leave entitlement of less than four weeks, and you are not permitted to cash out more than two weeks of leave in a 12 month period.

Taking annual leave in advance

You can take a period of paid annual leave before you have accrued an entitlement to take the leave if:

  • your award says you are able to; and
  • your employer agrees in writing to the advance payment.

The agreement between you and your employer must state the amount of the leave to be taken in advance and the date on which the leave is to start.

So you are aware, if your employment ends prior to you accruing the amount of the entitlement that you have taken in advance, your employer has the right to deduct any money owing from your final pay.

Managing excessive annual leave balances

If you have accrued an ‘excessive’ leave balance of at least eight weeks, you and your employer can reach an agreement to reduce your excessive leave balance.

If you and your employer cannot reach an agreement, then you can make a request in writing that you take a period of paid annual leave. However, you must have had your excessive leave balance for at least six months and your employer must not have issued a direction that would result in your excessive leave accrual being eliminated.  Any request must not result in your accrued annual leave balance being less than six weeks.

Your employer can also direct you to take annual leave in writing.

Anderson Gray lawyers are lawyers for employees in Sydney, Australia.  We are here to help you. Contact us today if you have any questions about your workplace entitlements.

who is protected from unfair dismissal

Who is Protected from Unfair Dismissal?

By | Unfair Dismissal

Persons Protected from Unfair Dismissal

If you are an employee, you are protected from unfair dismissal if:

  • your employer is an employer who is covered by the Fair Work Act; and
  • you meets the eligibility requirements set out in the Fair Work Act.

Is my employer required to comply with the Fair Work Act?

If an employer is a ‘National System Employer’, then they are required to comply with the rules set out in the Fair Work Act.  A National System Employer includes:

  • private sector employers in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania;
  • local government employers in Tasmania;
  • the Commonwealth and Commonwealth authorities;
  • all employers in Victoria (with limited exceptions in relation to some State public sector employees), the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory;
  • all employees on Norfolk Island, the Territory of Christmas Island and the Territory of Cocos (Keeling) Islands;
  • the employers of waterside employees, maritime employees and flight crew officers in interstate or overseas trade or commerce; and
  • employers that are constitutional corporations in Western Australia (including Pty Ltd companies)—this may include some local governments and authorities.

The following employers are not National System Employers?

  • Local Government employers in Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia;
  • State government employers in New South Wales, Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania;
  • Employers that are individuals, sole trader, partnerships and trusts in Western Australia; and
  • Employers of employees in the public sector in Victoria who hold high managerial positions.

What are the eligibility requirements?

An employee can make an application for unfair dismissal if they meet the following criteria:

  • you have completed the minimum period of employment. The minimum period is either six months if you work for an employer who employs 15 or more employees or 12 months if you work for an employer who has less than 15 employees. The number of employees are calculated by a simple headcount of all employees, including casual employees who are employed on a regular and systematic basis; and
  • you are employed pursuant to an industrial instrument such as an Award or enterprise bargaining agreement; or

If you are a not employed pursuant to an industrial instrument and you earn more than the high income threshold (which is currently $142,000 until 30 June 2018), then the Fair Work Commission will not have jurisdiction to hear a complaint for unfair dismissal – although, there may be other remedies available to you.

However, if you earn more than the high income threshold but a modern award or enterprise agreement covers your employment you can still be eligible. Contact Anderson Gray Lawyers to find out more if you think this applies to you.

Anderson Gray Lawyers are lawyers for employees and are unfair dismissal experts.  If you feel you have been unfairly dismissed from your employment, don’t hesitate to contact us today! We have offices in Brisbane, Sydney, and Melbourne.

unfair dismissal compensation

Can You Get Compensation for Unfair Dismissal?

By | Unfair Dismissal

Unfair Dismissal Compensation

The Fair Work Commission is the workplace relations tribunal that will consider your application for unfair dismissal. There are a number of remedies available to you if the Commission determines that you have been unfairly dismissed. These include:

reinstating you back into the job you were dismissed from; and/or

compensation (this is capped at 26 weeks pay).

The Commission will seek to have your job reinstated (if practical) or into a new position that is similar in hours, responsibilities and pay. If this occurs, you will also be entitled to back pay. The Commission may also make an order that your continuity of employment will be maintained and that there will be no break in your service or accrual of entitlements.

However, if it is not practical or reasonable to reinstate you (if a working relationship is not going to work), then alternatively compensation may be ordered as a remedy. Compensation is capped at 26 weeks pay and the total amount of compensation able to be awarded is half of the high income threshold amount that applies immediately before the dismissal. This is currently $71,000 as the high income threshold until 30 June 2018 is $142,000.

Any payments that:

  • are made to you by your employer, such as: notice payments; or
  • anything you may earn after you were dismissed by your employer;
  • will be taken into account by the Commission when it calculates the amount of compensation to be awarded.

You will not be awarded compensation for shock, distress or humiliation.

Conciliation Conferences

Did you know that you can also go to Conciliation?

Conciliation is a voluntary informal process to resolving disputes of unfair dismissal.

You and your employer can agree to a Conciliation and try and resolve the dispute in relation to your dismissal at the Conciliation. This means that if you can settle at Conciliation you do not need to go to a formal conference or hearing.

A Conciliation is private and you and your employer and the Conciliator will discuss the dispute and whether you and your employer may agree to a settlement. Settlements between you and your employer may include the following:

  • reinstatement of your job;
  • monetary settlement (compensation);
  • an apology from your employer;
  • a written statement of service from your employer;
  • payment of entitlements that have been unpaid and are owed to you by your employer (such as notice or leave payments); and/or
  • an agreement that you and your employer will not disparage (belittle or bad mouth) each other.

If you cannot reach a settlement then you can proceed to a formal hearing and the Commission will determine if you have been unfairly dismissed and if you will get your job back and/or any compensation.

Anderson Gray Lawyers are unfair dismissal experts in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne. If you need any further information about unfair dismissal and the options available to you, don’t hesitate to contact us today!