Category

Unpaid Wages

know how much you should be paid

Are you a Trainee or Apprentice? Do you Know What you Should be Paid?

By | Unfair Dismissal, Unpaid Wages

Knowing How Much You Should Be Paid

If you are a trainee or apprentice you ought to check that your employer is paying you the correct rate of pay.  If a modern award applies to you, then this workplace instrument covers your employment and sets out the minimum wages that apply to you (unless an enterprise agreement applies to you).

In some states, employers have been paying wages according to a state instrument.  For example, in Queensland, many employers would pay their apprentices with respect to the Order of Apprentices’ and Trainees’ Wages and Conditions (Excluding Certain Queensland Government Entities) 2003.  Queensland Awards and Orders that were Notional Agreement Preserving State Awards (NAPSA), such as the above Order, allowed for State Awards created prior to 27 March 2006, to continue to operate post the introduction of the modern awards system by the Federal Government in 2009.

In 2017, this view changed when the Fair Work Commission found that these instruments are no longer in force and have not continued to operate post 1 January 2014.

In light of this, your employer may not be paying you correctly.  If you think this may apply to you, check your applicable modern award at www.fwc.gov.au to confirm the correct rate of pay.

If you are not being paid correctly and are receiving a lesser amount then you are entitled to you may have an unpaid wages claim.  Did you know that you have six years in which to make an unpaid wage claim?  This means that you can make a claim for unpaid wages that goes back up to six years.

If you need any assistance, do not hesitate to contact Anderson Gray lawyers here in Melbourne, Sydney, and Brisbane – we are here to help.

Am I being paid enough? What is my right rate of pay?

By | General, Unfair Dismissal, Unpaid Wages

Am I getting the right amount of pay?

You would think this is a simple question, but it’s not.  There is no doubt that today’s workplace laws are complicated.  So it is no wonder that employees have difficulty in trying to work out what their rate of pay should be in return for a days hard work.

To work out the minimum rate of you are entitled first requires you to work out whether or not you are covered by an award.  An essential feature of an award is to prescribe the rate of pay for all employees covered by that particular award.

While trying to work out what particular award applies to you is difficult, we have set out below a simple process that is designed to give you some guidance.  So:

  • Step 1, review the award title to see if it might apply. For example, employees in the construction industry, might start by looking at the Building and Construction Onsite Award 2010, because, as the name suggests, it applies to that industry.
  • Step 2, go to clause 4 of the Award (it’s the same clause for all Modern Awards) and look to see whether the award covers the industry in which your employer operates. If it does, then that award is likely to apply to you.  If the award does not cover the industry in which your employer operates, then you’ll need to look at other awards to see if they might apply.
  • Step 3, turn to the classification definitions (usually found at Appendix B), and read through the classifications to identify the classification that best fits the actual duties you do on a day-to-day basis.
  • Step 4, check the rate of pay that relates to your classification of work in the body of the Award.

You must remember that the award sets out your minimum rate of pay.  So if you are not being paid the amount that relates to your classification of work under the award, then you might be being underpaid.

If you have a contract of employment that also sets out a rate of pay, then the rate of pay stipulated in the contract must be equal to or more than the rate you are required to be paid as set by the award.  If the contract states that your pay is less than the award rate, then again, you might not be being paid the right amount.

If the contract amount is more than the award rate, then for your ordinary hours of work, you’re probably going to be being paid the correct amount.  However, if you work more than 38 hours per week (on a full time basis), or more than the agreed hours (if you are a part-time employee), then the rate of pay needs to adjust to take account of your entitlement to overtime and/or penalty rates.

If you have any questions contact one our experienced employment lawyers.


Photo by James Sutton on Unsplash
unfair dismissal reasons

The Right Pay Dilemma

By | General, Unfair Dismissal, Unpaid Wages

Getting Paid the Right Amount

Being paid the right amount for hard work is an employee’s absolute right.  Incorrect or unpaid wages can seriously impact the working relationship between employee and employer.

The complex and often overlapping maze of awards, enterprise agreements and employment contracts often over complicates a basic and fundamental employee entitlement.  This maze of contractual terms often has the effect of confusing entitlements relating to overtime, penalty rates, time off in lieu and other employee entitlements.

Unfortunately, and perhaps because the system is complex, employers happen to apply the wrong minimum rate of pay for work performed.  Sometimes the employee is at fault, sometimes the adviser also gets it wrong.  Either way, ignorance is no excuse.

A recent case in the Federal Circuit Court has shown that even ‘expert’ advisers can get it wrong.  In this case, Ezy Accounting 123 Pty Ltd was pursued by the Fair Work Ombudsman for providing the employer with the wrong advice.

Whilst this is a potentially ground-breaking case in terms of extending the persons responsible for getting it wrong, it doesn’t change the fact that an employee should be paid the right rate for putting in a hard day’s work.  Unpaid wages are a genuine problem in businesses across Australia.

The good news is that the process for trying to recover your unpaid wages is fairly straightforward.  Often it will involve making a demand and then (if the matter is not resolved) seeking help from either the Fair Work Ombudsman or the relevant Court or Commission.

At Anderson Gray, we’d love help out anyone who’s been paid the wrong amount – because employees deserve the right pay for hard work done. Get in touch with our Melbourne unfair dismissal lawyers.